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Is the US Navy planning to implant people with microchips? Officials consult presidential candidate on ‘merging humans and machines’  Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3645171/Is-Navy-planning-implant-people-microchips-Officials-consult-Presidential-candidate-merging-humans-machines.

Is the US Navy planning to implant people with microchips? Officials consult presidential candidate on ‘merging humans and machines’ Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3645171/Is-Navy-planning-implant-people-microchips-Officials-consult-Presidential-candidate-merging-humans-machines.

A human microchip implant is an identifying integrated circuit device or RFID transponder encased in silicate glass and implanted in the body of a human being. A subdermal implant typically contains a unique ID number that can be linked to information contained in an external database, such as personal identification, medical history, medications, allergies, and contact information.

The first reported experiments with an RFID implant were carried out in 1998 by the British scientist Kevin Warwick. His implant was used to open doors, switch on lights, and cause verbal output within a building. After nine days the implant was removed and has since been held in the Science Museum (London).[citation needed]

On 16 March 2009 British scientist Mark Gasson had an advanced glass capsule RFID device surgically implanted into his left hand. In April 2010 Gasson’s team demonstrated how a computer virus could wirelessly infect his implant and then be transmitted on to other systems. Gasson reasoned that with implanted technology the separation between man and machine can become theoretical because the technology can be perceived by the human as being a part of their body. Because of this development in our understanding of what constitutes our body and its boundaries he became credited as being the first human infected by a computer virus. He has no plans to remove his implant.

Building access and security
The VeriChip Corporation has marketed the implant as a way to restrict access to secure facilities such as power plants. Microchip scanners would be installed at entrances so locks only work for persons whose chip numbers are entered into the system. Two employees of CityWatcher, an Ohio video surveillance company, had RFID tags injected into their arms in 2007. The workers needed the implants to access the company’s secure video tape room, as documented in USA Today. The company closed, but there is no word on what happened to the employees or their implants.

A major drawback for such systems is the relative ease with which the 16-digit ID number contained in a chip implant can be obtained and cloned using a hand-held device, a problem that has been demonstrated publicly by security researcher Jonathan Westhues and documented in the May 2006 issue of Wired magazine, among other places.

The Baja Beach Club, a nightclub in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, once used VeriChip implants for identifying VIP guests.
The Epicenter in Stockholm, Sweden is using RFID implants for employees to operate security doors, copiers, and pay for lunch.
Possible future applications
Theoretically, a GPS-enabled chip could one day make it possible for individuals to be physically located by latitude, longitude, altitude, speed, and direction of movement. Such implantable GPS devices are not technically feasible at this time. However, if widely deployed at some future point, implantable GPS devices could conceivably allow authorities to locate missing persons and/or fugitives and those who fled from a crime scene. Critics contend, however, that the technology could lead to political repression as governments could use implants to track and persecute human rights activists, labor activists, civil dissidents, and political opponents; criminals and domestic abusers could use them to stalk and harass their victims; slaveholders could use them to prevent captives from escaping; and child abusers could use them to locate and abduct children.

Another suggested application for a tracking implant, discussed in 2008 by the legislature of Indonesia’s Irian Jaya would be to monitor the activities of persons infected with HIV, aimed at reducing their chances of infecting other people. The microchipping section was not, however, included into the final version of the provincial HIV/AIDS Handling bylaw passed by the legislature in December 2008.With current technology, this would not be workable anyway, since there is no implantable device on the market with GPS tracking capability.

Since modern payment methods rely upon RFID/NFC, it is thought that implantable microchips, if they were to ever become popular in use, would form a part of the cashless society.[24] Verichip implants have already been used in nightclubs such as the Baja club for such a purpose, allowing patrons to purchase drinks with their implantable microchip.

Did you realise that a barcode is "framed " by a 6-6-6

Did you realise that a barcode is “framed “
by a 6-6-6 ??

 

‘Transhumanist’ Zoltan Istvan met with senior officials from the US Navy
They asked his advice to help them draw up policies on microchip implants
Mr Istvan believes all children should get implants so they can be tracked

Most of us carry a tracking device around with us every day in the form of the mobile phones, but some people are going further and having microchips embedded in their bodies.
Now the US Navy has grown so concerned over the practice that is drawing up an official policy to help it deal with personnel who have chips implanted.
Officials consulted with American presidential candidate and ‘transhumanist’ Zoltan Istvan to discuss the implications of fitting humans with microchips to enhance their powers.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3645171/Is-Navy-planning-implant-people-microchips-Officials-consult-Presidential-candidate-merging-humans-machines.html#ixzz4MtH8FAwg
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