A teenager has died after plunging 100ft from the Whispering Gallery at St Paul’s Cathedral in London.

The boy is believed to have fallen at the famous landmark yesterday afternoon at around 4pm.

London City Police confirmed they had been called to the scene just before 4pm yesterday ‘to a report of a male in his late teens who had fallen from the gallery within the building.’

They said: ‘The Helicopter Emergency Medical Service and police officers attended.

‘His death is not being treated as suspicious.’

The viewing gallery, which is popular with tourists who have to climb 257 steps to gain access, was due to close to sightseers at 4pm.

A London Ambulance Service spokesperson also confirmed they had been called. 

A video posted on Twitter showed emergency services arriving at the venue as shocked tourists waited outside

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A view looking down from the Whispering Gallery. The height is the equivalent of eight London buses

A view looking down from the Whispering Gallery. The height is the equivalent of eight London buses

A video posted on Twitter showed emergency services arriving at the venue as shocked tourists waited outside

Emergency services were called to the historic building but the teenager died at the scene.

It said in a statement: ‘We sent a number of resources to the scene including an incident response officer and London’s Air Ambulance.

‘Sadly, despite the efforts of medics, a person died at the scene.’ 

The cathedral reopened at 10am this morning for sightseeing.

Ms Dragescu, from Romford, Essex fell to her death in front of shcoked tourists after climbing over the safety barriers on the viewing platform on October 2017.

She had two notes written in her native Romanian in her hands when she fell and had said goodbye to her mother Isabela just an hour-and-a-half before.

Mrs Dragescu, 44, said at the time that her daughter ‘wanted to see how it was on the other side’ and ‘picked the cathedral because she needed to fly into God’s arms.’      

The Whispering Gallery runs around the interior of the building’s dome, and gets its name from a ‘charming quirk in its construction’ which makes a whisper against its walls audible on the opposite side.

It overlooks the iconic hall of the cathedral, which was built in the 17th Century to designs by Sir Christopher Wren.  

  

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