Squander bug said to have ‘shopping disease’ 😊

MEET THE SQUANDER BUG

This unpleasant-looking character is called the Squander Bug, and it was created during the Second World War by artist Phillip Boydell, an employee of the National Savings Committee. The Committee raised funds by urging the public to save their own money and invest it in the war effort.

The cartoon bug appeared in press adverts and poster campaigns as a menace who encouraged shoppers to waste money rather than buy war savings certificates.

The campaign was extremely popular and the cartoon was adapted for use in other countries, including Australia and New Zealand. The American children’s author Dr Seuss created his own version of the Squander Bug for use in war savings campaigns in the United States.

Here are six different faces of the Squander Bug.POSTERS

THE SQUANDERBUG ALIAS HITLER’S PAL

‘Wanted for sabotage – the Squanderbug alias Hitler’s Pal’.See object record

a portrait of the cartoon character the Squander Bug, set within a design of a 'Wanted' poster pinned to a wall. text: WANTED FOR SABOTAGE THE SQUANDERBUG ALIAS HITLER'S PAL KNOWN TO BE AT LARGE IN CERTAIN PARTS OF THE KINGDOM USUALLY FOUND IN THE COMPANY OF USELESS ARTICLES, HAS A TEMPTING LEER AND A FLATTERING MANNER WANTED ALSO FOR THE CRIME OF 'SHOPPERS DISEASE' INFORMATION CONCERNING THIS PEST SHOULD BE REPORTED TO W.F.P.299.

© IWM (Art.IWM PST 3406)POSTERS

DON’T BE A SQUANDER BUG!

‘Don’t be a Squander Bug – keep up your war savings’.See object record

a three-quarter length depiction of a male civilian wearing a suit and tie. He has just returned home from shopping, and holds two parcels. As he puts his hat and umbrella down on a table, he looks at himself in a mirror, where he sees himself transformed into the Squander Bug character. text: DON'T BE A SQUANDER BUG A.L.-6 KEEP UP YOUR WAR SAVINGS.

© IWM (Art.IWM PST 16538)POSTERS

DON’T LISTEN TO THE SQUANDER BUG

‘Don’t listen to the Squander Bug – buy war savings’.See object record

a depiction of the cartoon character the Squander Bug, pointing at the title of the poster. text: SHARE OUT DATE [partially blank text inset] 'IT TOOK THEM MONTHS TO SAVE IT UP - BUT I'LL HELP THEM TO SPEND IT IN NO TIME!' DON'T LISTEN TO THE SQUANDER BUG BUY WAR SAVINGS W.F.P. 304. ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL SAVINGS COMMITTEE, LONDON. F and C LTD. 51-3711.

© IWM (Art.IWM PST 15453)SOUVENIRS AND EPHEMERA

TARGET PRACTICE

An air rifle target of a Squander Bug, made to look like Hitler.See object record

Squander Bug air rifle target mounted on a wood baton, there are numerous swastika symbols stencilled on the 'target', the bug additionally has five legs made from lead - one may be missing.

© IWM (EPH 4611)POSTERS

SQUASH THE SQUANDER BUG

‘Squash the Squander Bug – put your money into war savings’.See object record

a depiction of the Squander Bug - a bug-like cartoon character - carrying a bag of money. He runs away from the foot of an unseen man who is trying to stamp on him. The word 'savings' is inscribed on the sole of the man's shoe. text: Squash the SQUANDER BUG SAVINGS £ N.S.O. No. 31. Issued by the New Zealand National War Savings Committee, Wellington. PUT YOUR MONEY INTO 3% NATIONAL WAR SAVINGS.

© IWM (Art.IWM PST 16851)POSTERS

KILL THAT PEST

‘After ‘im – kill that pest with war savings’.See object record

a depiction of the cartoon character the Squander Bug, cowering against a haystack as three terrier dogs run towards him. text: after 'im - KILL THAT PEST WITH WAR SAVINGS W.F.P. 318. Issued by the National Savings Committee, London, and the Scottish Savings Committee, Edinburgh. Printed for H.M. Stationery Office by G.C.M. Printing Service Ltd., Leicester. T51/3988.

© IWM (Art.IWM PST 15460)

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© IWM 2021

Published by technofiend1

Kazan- Kazan National Research Technical University Казанский национальный исследовательский технический университет имени А. Н. Туполева he graduated in Economics in 1982

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