The Trent 900 ran for the first time on 18 March 2003, achieving its certification thrust of 81,000 lbf (360 kN) on 2 April and attaining 88,000 lbf (390 kN) a week later, with growth room to 94,000 lbf (420 kN). Its 300 cm (118 in) fan comes from the Trent 8104 demonstrator

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Rolls-Royce Trent 900

The Rolls-Royce Trent 900 is a high-bypass turbofan produced by Rolls-Royce plc to power the Airbus A380, competing with the Engine Alliance GP7000. Initially proposed for the Boeing 747-500/600X in July 1996, this first application was later abandoned but it was offered for the A3XX, launched as the A380 in December 2000. It first ran on 18 March 2003, made its maiden flight on 17 May 2004 on an A340 testbed, and was certified by the EASA on 29 October 2004. Producing up to 374 kN (84,000 lbf), the Trent 900 has the three shaft architecture of the Rolls-Royce Trent family with a 2.95 m (116 in) fan. It has a 8.5-8.7:1 bypass ratio and a 37–39:1 overall pressure ratio.

Trent 900
TypeTurbofan
National originUnited Kingdom
ManufacturerRolls-Royce plc
First run18 March 2003[1]
Major applicationsAirbus A380
Developed fromTrent 800
Developed intoTrent 1000

DevelopmentEdit

A Trent 900 on test at the Arnold Engineering Development Complex

In July 1996, Rolls-Royce offered the Trent 900 for the proposed Boeing 747-500/600X, targeting a 2000 service entry and competing with the General Electric/Pratt & Whitney Engine Alliance. With a scaled-down Trent 800 core and a similar 2.8 m (110 in) fan, increasing bypass ratio from 6.5 to 8.5, the 345–365 kN (78,000–82,000 lbf) engine could also power the Airbus A3XX.[2] The $450 million development aimed for a December 1999 certification but the 747X was later abandoned, leaving the A3XX, its Airbus competitor, as a possible application from 2003.[3]

By July 2000, the Trent 900 was the first engine to be ordered for the A3XX, by then with a swept fan.[4] By September, its design was not frozen and the fan diameter could increase by up to 13 cm (5 in) for a 68,000 to 80,000 lbf (300 to 360 kN) thrust.[5] The A3XX was launched as the A380 on 19 December 2000.[6] It was then selected by Singapore Airlines and Virgin Atlantic over the competing GP7200.[7] The Trent 900 ran for the first time on 18 March 2003, achieving its certification thrust of 81,000 lbf (360 kN) on 2 April and attaining 88,000 lbf (390 kN) a week later, with growth room to 94,000 lbf (420 kN). Its 300 cm (118 in) fan comes from the Trent 8104 demonstrator, and a contra-rotating HP spool is used for the first time, for up to 2% better efficiency.[1]

The Trent 900 made its maiden flight on 17 May 2004 on Airbus’ A340-300 testbed, replacing the port inner CFM56 engine.[8] Its final certification was granted by the EASA on 29 October 2004,[9] and the FAA on 4 December 2006. After a twelve-month suspension caused by delays to the A380, Rolls-Royce announced in October 2007 that production of the Trent 900 had been restarted.[10] On 27 September 2007, British Airways announced the selection of the Trent 900 to power 12 A380 aircraft,[11] helping to take the engine’s share of the A380 engine market to 52% at the end of February 2009.

Design

Variants

Upgrades

Applications

Operational history

Cost

Engines on display

Specifications (Trent 900)

See also

References

External links

Last edited 26 days ago by BilCat

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Content is available under CC BY-SA 3.0 unless otherwise noted.

Published by technofiend1

Kazan- Kazan National Research Technical University Казанский национальный исследовательский технический университет имени А. Н. Туполева he graduated in Economics in 1982

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